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Parental Responsibility

Parental responsibility (PR) in family law is a legal status derived from the Children Act 1989. You may be quite rightly regarded as a ‘responsible’ parent by a host of organisations, even singly responsible for your child’s daily care, but at the same time not have the formal status of a parent with parental responsibility. Generally this page will be concerned with a child’s parents and their parental responsibility. However, others, besides parents, can have parental responsibility for a child; for example, a local authority for children in its care, a child’s guardian, a child’s stepfather and perhaps a child’s grandparents or other relatives will be able acquire parental responsibility in certain circumstances.

In some instances explained elsewhere on this webpage, unless you have parental responsibility you will not be considered to be a ‘parent’ of the child since the definition of parent in some instances only includes parents with parental responsibility.

Up to six people can have PR for a child.

What is Parental Responsibility


Parental responsibility was a legal concept first defined in the Children Act 1989 (s3) as, “all the rights, duties, powers, responsibilities and authority which by law a parent of a child has in relation to the child and his property. “ Detailed and explicit definition as to what this encompasses was deliberately avoided. Over the years a number of Court of Appeal judgments have given flesh to the bones of the bare definition provided in the statute. The 1989 Act emphasised parental responsibilities over parental rights but in many instances a parent must exercise his rights in order to perform his responsibilities. For example, in order to fulfill your parental responsibility to see that your child attends school and is educated properly a parent must be accorded certain rights with regard to the education system. Parental responsibility, unless discharged, runs until the child reaches the age of 18, though its importance and impact on the child will diminish as the child grows older and his own views and wishes carry more weight.

Parental responsibility also confers status on a parent. This status is important for:

(a) the father and the mother: unless both parents have parental responsibility the parent with care (PWC) (and the non-resident parent (NRP) themselves) may view the NRP as a ‘second-class’ parent, rather than as an equal parent. A NRP perceiving himself as a second class parent may be less inclined to involve themselves with their child, be more inclined to walk away; a PWC, regarding the NRP as a second-class parent may ignore the NRP and make all important decisions about the child without any reference to them.

There is no difference in law between the powers of mothers and fathers.


(b) the child: though in most instances the child will not be made aware of parental responsibility, in separated families the child needs to have a positive image of the parent he no longer lives with in order to bolster his own self-esteem. Lord Justice Ward’s words from the 1995 judgment Re S (Parental Responsibility) are frequently quoted to emphasise this aspect.

(c) public authorities; all are more willing to fully engage with a parent who has formal parental responsibility and to treat him as an equal parent, than a parent who does not.

Do parents with parental responsibility need to share decision making?

s2(7) of the Children Act 1989 states:

Where more than one person has parental responsibility for a child, each of them may act alone and without the other (or others) in meeting that responsibility;

However case-law has established that in certain circumstances parents are under a legal duty to consult, meaning that where parents are separated, the resident parent is not always entitled to act without first consulting her ex-partner. Back in 1998 the Court of Appeal (Re H (Parental Responsibility) said that a father with parental responsibility would have to be consulted on “schooling, serious medical problems and other important occurrences in the child's life'.

Parental responsibility is not concerned with the day-to-day care of the child, does not permit either (separated) parent to interfere with how the other parent cares for the child when the child is in their care. In A v A (Shared Residence) [2004] EWHC142 at paragraph 118 Mr Justice Wall remarked:

‘It is a basic principle that, post separation, each parent with parental responsibility retains an equal and independent right and responsibility to be informed and make appropriate decisions about their children. However, where children are being looked after by one parent, that parent needs to be in a position to take the day-to-day decisions that have to be taken while that parent is caring for the children. Parents should not be seeking to interfere with one another in matters which are taking place while they do not have the care of their children. Subject to any questions which are regulated by court order, the object of the exercise should be to maintain flexible and practical arrangements whenever possible.’

The parents in the case above had, with the help of NYAS, agreed a ‘Schedule of Items in Relation to their Exercise of Parental Responsibility’, a schedule which Mr Justice Wall chose to endorse by appending it to the end of his judgment. The schedule differentiated between 3 sorts of decisions:

(a) Decisions that could be taken independently and without any consultation or notification to the other parent

(b) Decisions where one parent would always need to inform the other parent of the decision, but did not need to consult or take the other parent’s views into account

(c) Decisions that you would need to both inform and consult the other parent

Though there is no absolute agreement, the rule of thumb is that the following matters require the consent of all those who have parental responsibility for the child:

Change of surname (even where there is no residence order)

Removing the child from the jurisdiction (i.e. England and Wales) for more than one month

Committing to a serious and irreversible operation (except in an emergency)

Change of school

Who automatically has parental responsibility for a child?

Many parents will have parental responsibility without being aware that they do.

All mothers, whether married or unmarried, automatically have parental responsibility for any child born to them. [Children Act 1989 s2(1) & s2(2)(a)]

Fathers who were married to the mother of the child when the child was born also automatically have parental responsibility. [CA 1989 s2(1)]

How can an 'unmarried father' obtain parental responsibility?

Unmarried Fathers can acquire parental responsibility in any of the following ways:

(a) By jointly registering the child’s birth with the mother (for births registered after 1 December 2003) you will automatically gain parental responsibility (i.e. there will be no separate official document stating that you have PR) [CA 1989 s4(1)(a)]. It is the date of registration, not the date of birth which is important in determining whether the father has parental responsibility.

(b) By re-registering the birth for pre December 2003 registrations, to add the father’s details, you will automatically gain parental responsibility [CA 1989 s4(1)(a)].
You would either need the mother to attend with you or provide a formal declaration of agreement that your name is to be added to the birth record.
NB: the birth can only be re-registered if the father’s name was omitted from the original registration. If it is already there, you cannot re-register, and therefore you cannot gain parental responsibility by this means.

(c) By subsequently marrying the mother of the child you automatically gain PR [CA 1989 s2(3)Family Law Reform Act 1987 s(1)]

(d) By obtaining a residence order from the court (PR is a ‘by-product’ of the residence order) you will automatically acquire parental responsibility [CA 1989 s12(1)], although in this form PR will terminate when the resident order ends (usually age 16).

(e) A birth parent can sign a parental responsibility agreement on form C(PRA1) according to the Children Act 1989. This document itself will signify that you have parental responsibility for the child) [CA 1989 s4(1)(2)].

(f) A step-parent's PR agreement can ne made by consent with all those already having PR for the child on form C(PRA2) according to the Children & Adoption Act 2002.

(g) By obtaining a parental responsibility order from the court. The order will specifically state that the court has granted you parental responsibility. [CA 1989 s4(1)(3)]

(h) By obtaining an adoption order from the court.


Only with (d), (e), (f), (g) and (h) will you obtain a document that explicitly states that the father has parental responsibility for the child. With the other means of obtaining parental responsibility there will be no separate documentation confirming parental responsibility, the documentation of the status acquired (marriage, child’s birth certificate, etc.) being themselves evidence of parental responsibility.

Can the mother's new partner have parental responsibility for my child?

The mother’s new husband can acquire parental responsibility by either (a) a parental responsibility agreement (b) by the court making a parental responsibility order following the step-father’s application or (c) by having a residence order made in his favour (a joint residence order with the mother would be the norm). The mother’s new boyfriend/partner cannot have parental responsibility for your child – only her husband (or girlfriend, if she is in a formally recognised civil partnership).

Should the birth father himself not have parental responsibility, the mother (all mothers have parental responsibility) can, without the birth father’s agreement, enter into a parental responsibility agreement with her new husband [CA1989 s4A(1)(a)]. If you, the birth father have parental responsibility your agreement is required. You will not lose your parental responsibility should you enter into a parental responsibility agreement or the court makes an order giving the step-father parental responsibility.

Some birth fathers strongly resent another man having parental responsibility for his child whilst others recognise that if their child spends a great deal of time with the step-father, particularly if the step-father cares for the child alone, then it makes sense for that adult to have parental responsibility. Of course, we would expect the birth father to have parental responsibility too.

Allowing a step-parent to acquire parental responsibility was brought in by the Children and Adoption Act 2002 in order to address the circumstances in which step-fathers would apply to adopt the child in order to acquire parental responsibility. Prior to the Act around a quarter of all adoptions concerned step-parents. An ‘unmarried’ step-father, though he cannot acquire parental responsibility by way of a parental responsibility agreement or order can, if in an ‘enduring’ relationship with the mother, still adopt the child.

How can a parental responsibility agreement be made?

Whist unmarried couples are co-operating harmoniously over the parenting of their child the fact that the father doesn’t have parental responsibility is not likely to be an issue. It is only when disputes arise that it becomes so, and this, of course, is the time least likely for the mother to be persuaded to agree for the father to have equal parental responsibility. The father is in a position of having to ‘sell’ the idea to the mother and to convince her that by making this agreement for the benefit of their child she is not going to disadvantage herself. It is almost inevitable that she may regard it as giving away some of her absolute control. Also, the fact that the agreement cannot be made without both parents attending the court office is often itself reason enough for a mother to decline. Inertia on her part, not even opposition, could be the limiting factor.

Floating the idea to the mother without alarming her can be a delicate task and this sample letter (PDF or Word download) may just provide a beginning to which you may add some persuasive arguments of your own.
A parental responsibility agreement has to be made on a specified form and filed with the Principal Registry.

The notes accompanying the PRA Form give full instructions as to how to go about this. Currently, there is no charge for making such an agreement. The following points should be noted:

* Only the biological parents can make a Parental Responsibility Agreement
* Step-parents must apply on C(PRA2).
* The child must be resident in England or Wales.
* A separate form must be filled in for each child.
* All parents with PR and giving consent, and the prospective parents must attend with documentary evidence of their identity.

How can an application be made for a parental responsibility order?

Less than 2% of the 11,000 applications for parental responsibility in 2006 were refused. The number of applications for parental responsibility is falling, following the new regulations which came into force in December 2003 which gave automatic parental responsibility to those fathers who jointly sign the birth certificate.
Generally, fathers who apply for a parental responsibility order choose to do so in tandem with an application for contact. They may have come to terms with not having parental responsibility and would not choose to go to court on this sole issue and stand the chance of antagonising the mother. But when problems over contact arise, since both applications can be incorporated on the same form for a single fee, they will apply for a contact order and a parental responsibility order together.

Combining applications for both orders (PR and contact) is more efficient and simple, but often the fairly straightforward decision about, and almost inevitable award of, parental responsibility, gets delayed until the contact issue is resolved. A stand-alone application for parental responsibility could be disposed of very quickly. Furthermore, since in many instances a mother’s opposition to the father’s application for parental responsibility would have no real merit or chance of success she should not benefit from legal aid funding and in many instances would be required to act in person or pay for legal representation. This factor alone could result in her not opposing the application or even, perhaps under pressure from the court, opting to make a parental responsibility agreement.

However, when the father is applying for both contact and parental responsibility, the mother, with the help of her (often publicly funded) solicitor can choose to argue against the granting of parental responsibility, just to be difficult, knowing that parental responsibility is almost certain to be awarded. S1(2) Children Act 1989 does require the court to dispose of te PR element of the application "without undue delay".

Section 4 of the Children Act does not stipulate the criteria which a father must meet in order to be given parental responsibility but just before the Children Act came into force in 1991 the Court of Appeal decision in Re H (Illegitimate Children: Parental Rights) dealt with this matter and since then the following factors have remained central to any decision:

a) That the status of the birth father is not in dispute.

b) The degree of commitment which the father has shown towards the child (this can be illustrated by financial support, pursuing contact and keeping arrangements, present at birth, having one's name on the birth certificate, involvement in child's education etc).

c) The degree of attachment existing between the father and the child (naturally a father of a very young child may have had less opportunity to develop this).

d) The reasons for the father's application (to weed out applications made solely to be obstructive or disruptive since the overwhelming number of applications will be made for genuine motives).

e) Any other relevant factors.

How can parental responsibility be obtained by a residence order?

The parental responsibility order goes hand in hand with the residence order, so if the residence order is discharged (as they sometimes are, especially with shared residence orders) then the parental responsibility order will also be terminated. You would have notice of any application to have the residence order discharged or varied to one of sole residence to the mother, and therefore would have an opportunity to apply for a parental responsibility order – though a separate application would surely be unnecessary in the proceedings. In any event, under Family Proceeding Rule 4.4 and FPCR 4 an application can be made by way of statement.

Simply mentioning the ramifications of removing residence from you as regards your parental responsibility would be sufficient for the court to address this by making a parental responsibility order.

I don't have parental responsibility - does it matter?

Guardians and death of a parent (CA1989 s5)
Should the mother die and has appointed a guardian (generally in a will) the guardian will automatically acquire parental responsibility if the father doesn’t have parental responsibility (and if the mother has a sole residence order the appointment of her guardian will stand, whether or not the father has parental responsibility).

A father with parental responsibility can appoint someone to be the child’s guardian upon his death but this will not have any effect if the mother outlives him (unless the father has a residence order for the child) since the mother will have parental responsibility.

Being the child’s guardian (in many instances the mother’s relative, the maternal grandmother or aunt will be nominated by the mother as the guardian) and acquiring parental responsibility for the child doesn’t automatically mean that the child will live with and be brought up by the guardian. However, this is likely to be the default position and likely to provide the status quo which the father may then have to attempt to reverse by making an application for residence.

These matters will take on more significance if the guardian lives far away and the child's move to the guardian’s locality will diminish or even terminate the child’s previously established contact with his father.


Removing the child from the jurisdiction

A father without PR has no status internationally should the mother decide to ‘up sticks’ and simply go and live anywhere else in the world (unless there is a residence order in force (CA s13). In many instances a father will tend to know whether this is a possibility – perhaps in instances where the mother is originally from another country and still has close family living there; or when she has began a serious relationship with a man from a different part of the world. With forewarning, a father, even one without parental responsibility, could obtain a prohibited steps order that specifically prevented the mother from removing the child from England and Wales. Frequently, however, a mother may take the child on ‘holiday’ but have no intention of returning.

If the father has parental responsibility then the mother would either have to obtain his permission for permanent removal or apply to the court for leave to remove the child. If she retained the child abroad to live in another country she will be viewed as having unlawfully abducted the child and steps can be taken to have the child returned to the jurisdiction.

Technically, under the Child Abduction Act 1984, removal from the jurisdiction, even for a short holiday, requires the consent of everyone with parental responsibility for the child – or leave of the court. In practice, mothers who don’t have the right to take the child for “less than one month” bestowed upon them by a residence order [CA1989 s13(2)], routinely take their children abroad on holiday without a second thought about obtaining the father’s permission – and their lawyers routinely fail to remind them that the father’s permission is required.


Adding the father’s name to the birth certificate

If the father’s name is not on the birth certificate and he has parental responsibility then he can, even without the mother’s consent, have the child’s birth re-registered to include his name. Most fathers and their children think it is important to have the father’s name on the birth certificate but a significant number of mothers may not. There is no charge for this but, as with copies of all birth certificates, certificates containing the newly added information have to be paid for. Further information on how to go about this can be found on the government’s General Record Office website.


Accessing information about your child

Education - In practice, it is necessary to have parental responsibility to be fully involved in your child's schooling. See this link for further details.

Health - The prevailing view is that parental responsibility is required for a father to be allowed to be given access to his child’s medical information. The General Medical Council’s Guidance for Doctors in relation to children (0-18 years) when referring to sharing information with ‘parents’ specifically defines these as being parents with parental responsibility. If you don’t have parental responsibility, as far as the GMC is concerned, you are not a parent. For further information refer to the Doctors page of this website.


Placing your child for adoption

The Adoption and Children Act 2002 s52 (6) defines a ‘parent’ as a parent with parental responsibility, requiring the agreement of all such parents to be obtained (or their permission to be dispensed with by the court) before a child is placed for adoption. A father without parental responsibility has no absolute right to be involved in the proposed adoption of his child.

You may consider the likelihood of adoption not to be anywhere on the horizon; but people’s circumstances change, mothers do re-partner to abusive men, do get involved in substance abuse, do have their children taken into care by social services. Your child could be involved in such a situation.

 

  • https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.exeterexpressandecho.co.uk%2FExeter-judge-slams-8216-hysterical-8217-reaction%2Fstory-21311546-detail%2Fstory.html%23gxBMC3QqYLHAB5IH.01
  • In conclusion to the horror of the last almost four years of my life and the lives of all my children. To all those that had any doubt, all those that actually believed that i was capable of such terrible things, to all those who without saying one word to me cut me and my older children out and cast us aside. To all those who (despicably) hide in their "Christianity" standing in judgment and condemnation without hearing or knowing or even wanting to know the truth. To all those who through a pretence of "love" hurt my children through their complicit conspiring. Not one person, some of whom i have known for more than 20 years ever said a word to me, nor sought the truth. Being satisfied that i was this "demon" and still to this day stay hidden after their collusion, gossip and reprehensible behaviour. Even now preferring to think there must have been some truth, some sense that i was at least in part guilty of some crime.... shame on you. Shame on you for standing by while my children were torn apart, shame on you that you stood by while my children were used as pawns and weapons against me and each other. That some of you had the gall to say one word of negativity without ever attempting to find the truth. Utterly exonerated.... no question mark, no doubt. From a judge that has been criticised for his sympathy towards mothers and his stance against fathers. His words will live with me forever. Four sets of barristers, four sets of solicitors and social services after reading thousands of pages of material concluded and echoed the judges comments. I did not win my children back because i had clever solicitors !!!! It was because the truth was so completely obvious....its just no one wanted to listen, Preferring the lie to the truth. To this day despite everything....despite caring for my kids, giving myself and my life to being there for my children, there are still those that prefer to believe the lie. My kids are now well on their way to being fully engaged in their lives, doing excellently at school and moving forward. One lesson can be drawn.... dont judge lest ye be judged.... Exeter judge slams ‘hysterical’ reaction to abuse claims By Exeter Express and Echo | Posted: July 01, 2014 Exeter Crown Court Teachers and specialists who help domestic violence victims “accepted without question” abuse allegations a woman made against her former partner, a family court judge has said. Unnecessary safeguards were put in place at schools and children got caught up in an “hysterical and paranoiac” atmosphere, said Judge David Tyzack. School staff would almost certainly have realised that the man presented no risk had anyone “bothered” to contact him, said the judge. The judge said the case showed that it was essential for professionals to keep an open mind and realise that allegations were not proved simply because someone made them. He made his comments in a written ruling on the case following a hearing in a county court in Exeter, Devon. Judge Tyzack said the case centred on a 14-year-old boy and a girl aged 11. He said he had been asked to decide whether allegations their mother had made against their father were true. He did not identify anyone involved but said the local authority with responsibility for the children’s welfare was Devon County Council. Judge Tyzack said the man and woman had five children in total and had been together for more than 20 years. The judge said the case related to the welfare and futures of two of those five children. He said he had found all the mother’s allegations to be “completely untrue”. “The allegations made by the mother are, without needing to go into all of the details, that the father physically, sexually and emotionally abused her during their 23-year relationship, during most of which they were married,” said Judge Tyzack. “She also alleges that, as each of their five children were born, he similarly abused them. “No allegations of any kind were made by the mother, for example to the police or social services, prior to the separation... “However, after the separation the mother sought help from agencies that specialise in helping and advising people, mostly women, who are the victims of domestic violence. “These included the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and the Domestic Violence and Abuse Service. “Both organisations of course do invaluable work in the context of assisting children and vulnerable people, but it has been a consistent feature of the evidence that this court has heard that certain professionals working in those agencies habitually accepted, without question, the allegations made against this father by the mother. “They invariably accepted what she told them, uncritically and without any attempt to examine or investigate the other side of the coin. “Exactly the same applies to teachers at schools attended by (the two children). “Safeguarding procedures were put in place at their schools which were completely unnecessary. “Had anyone from the children’s schools bothered to contact the father, they would have almost certainly realised that he presented no risk or danger, but inevitably the children were caught up in this hysterical and paranoiac atmosphere. “There is a very real danger, in my judgment, of professionals treating the alleged victim’s allegations as completely truthful and the alleged perpetrator as a sort of pariah. “All the allegations made by the mother in this case have been found to be completely untrue.” Judge Tyzack said the woman had suffered from ‘‘mental ill-health‘’ and had influenced some of the children. He said the children had been “seriously damaged”. “It is essential at all times for professionals to keep an open mind. Allegations of domestic violence are not proved simply by a person, however seemingly credible, making an allegation or indeed several allegations,” said the judge. “Professionals need to be vigilant in dealing with an alleged victim of domestic violence to ascertain whether he or she is suffering from mental ill-health.” He went on: “This court regards domestic violence, when proved, as being of the utmost seriousness. Often it involves the exploitation of the vulnerable by a dominant person. Often, when proved, it amounts to criminal behaviour. It causes massive distress, often injury, and when children are involved they too often suffer horrible abuse. “Nothing that I have said... in any way diminishes the seriousness of this kind of behaviour and the court’s attitude to it. However, it is almost as serious, in my judgment, for a person to invent allegations of domestic violence and still worse for a parent to influence children that abuse has occurred when it has not... “That is what I have found has happened in this case. The children involved have been so caught up in the toxic combination of the mother’s false allegations, her hysterical reaction to the father and her mental ill-health that the children have been completely estranged from their father. It is going to require very skilled work to heal and restore.” Read more: http://www.exeterexpressandecho.co.uk/Exeter-judge-slams-8216-hysterical-8217-reaction/story-21311546-detail/story.html#Yo0Xx2404TxpAVoj.01#ixzz3T3GZC5ob Follow us: @expressandecho on Twitter | expressecho on Facebook

    Teachers and specialists who help domestic violence victims 'accepted without question' abuse allegations a woman made against her former partner, a family court judge has said. Unnecessary safeguards...
    exeterexpressandecho.co.ukTeachers and specialists who help domestic violence victims 'accepted without question' abuse allegations a woman made against her former partner, a family court judge has said. Unnecessary safeguards...

    2015-02-28T14:55:44+0000
  • New FNF article in Divorce Magazine - tips for parents starting to have difficulties with seeing their children after separation: http://www.thedivorcemagazine.co.uk/trouble-seeing-your-children/

    Trouble seeing your children after divorce? Child access and child visitation article by Families need Fathers. Coping with divorce and Joint custody
    thedivorcemagazine.co.ukTrouble seeing your children after divorce? Child access and child visitation article by Families need Fathers. Coping with divorce and Joint custody

    2015-02-27T09:35:00+0000
  • may be this is where i can find some solace, been separated from my kids for 6 months now and i'm finding it very hard being away from them.just miss being with them full time especially when they need me to comfort them when they are not well. sometimes i think why have kids when you can't enjoy them,but i love them to bits. why are a lot of the women so selfish once they get what they want the kids they just rid of their dads, saddens me.my little one are 4 and 2
  • Has anyone been involved with NYAS. If so what has been your experience
  • Finding handovers for contact difficult? These tips can help to make the process a little easier: http://goo.gl/qarUwj
  • Can you help with a survey on attitudes to prenatal genetic testing? More details here: http://goo.gl/J0UKe5
    2015-02-23T10:54:57+0000
  • More details about yesterday's announcement on DNA testing: http://www.familylawweek.co.uk/site.aspx?i=ed143220

    DNA tests in family courts will be provided across England from later this year, Justice Minister Simon Hughes has announced. From September all family court judges in England will be able to order DNA tests to determine a child's parentage.This follows two pilot schemes in Taunton and Bristol which…
    familylawweek.co.ukDNA tests in family courts will be provided across England from later this year, Justice Minister Simon Hughes has announced. From September all family court judges in England will be able to order DNA tests to determine a child's parentage.This follows two pilot schemes in Taunton and Bristol which…

    2015-02-18T09:23:51+0000
  • On our own where tough but together where invincible https://www.facebook.com/Father.that.care
    2015-02-18T01:18:40+0000
  • Government plans for court ordered DNA testing are a positive move for dads in cases where paternity is being denied by the other parent - FNF comment: http://www.fnf.org.uk/news-events-2/press-releases

    Families Need Fathers (FNF) is a registered UK charity, founded in 1974. It provides information and support to parents, including unmarried parents, of either sex.
    fnf.org.ukFamilies Need Fathers (FNF) is a registered UK charity, founded in 1974. It provides information and support to parents, including unmarried parents, of either sex.

    2015-02-17T11:37:29+0000
  • Family courts to be able to order and fund DNA testing where paternity is disputed from September: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-31492078

    Family court judges in England will be able to order DNA tests to determine a child's parentage from September, Justice Minister Simon Hughes announces.
    bbc.co.ukFamily court judges in England will be able to order DNA tests to determine a child's parentage from September, Justice Minister Simon Hughes announces.

    2015-02-17T11:34:14+0000
  • This week's quiz. Do You Know Your Shared Residence? Just 10 questions. http://gotoquiz.com/PjHIv #familylaw

    The following quiz is for lay advisers and charity staff helping parents and children to make post-separation child arrangements. Only 10 questions to test your knowledge on shared residence/shared living arrangements.
    gotoquiz.comThe following quiz is for lay advisers and charity staff helping parents and children to make post-separation child arrangements. Only 10 questions to test your knowledge on shared residence/shared living arrangements.

    2015-02-09T12:42:06+0000
  • ***I URGENTLY NEED GOOD SOLICITOR & BARRISTER *** enyone with good experience and name of solicitor & Barrister from LONDON & KENT ? Thanks
  • I'm looking for advise from fathers that who have successfully got their 'foreign' children back to the UK! I am a UK citizen in Belgium, so it is not possible to represent myself in court!.. The costs are mounting up and although i have an extremely strong case to get my son to the UK, things are just not moving fast enough! Does anybody have advice?.. I have spoken to reunite.org, but there is little that they can do.. Are their any funds out there available to me, some person or organisation willing to help me with the legal costs?
  • Do you know your family law? http://www.thecustodyminefield.blogspot.co.uk/2015/02/do-you-know-your-family-law-answers-and.html

    Community Newswire: 'Courts urged to replace guiding case in child custody cases'Cumberland News: 'Legal Boost for Brampton man's parent's rights campaign'Family Law Week: 'Mr Justice Mostyn calls for review of Poel and Payne'.McKenzie Magazine: 'Campaigning Successes x 2: Kids in the Middle and Bey…
    thecustodyminefield.blogspot.comCommunity Newswire: 'Courts urged to replace guiding case in child custody cases'Cumberland News: 'Legal Boost for Brampton man's parent's rights campaign'Family Law Week: 'Mr Justice Mostyn calls for review of Poel and Payne'.McKenzie Magazine: 'Campaigning Successes x 2: Kids in the Middle and Bey…

    2015-02-03T14:00:38+0000
  • whats the point of this or any other organisation. all very well you that you know what goes on but you cant do anything about.. IT THE M.P THAT SHOULD DO SAMTHING! MY SON HAS SAID TO THE C S A..THAT HE WILL STOP ALL PAYMENTS TO HER MUM ,UNTILL HE GET TO SEE HIS DAUGTHER. THE REPLY TO THIS WAS, THEN YOUR GO TO PRISON, ALSO IF YOUR NOT SEEING YOU DAUGHTER THEN YOU NEED TO PAY MORE(HE PAYS 260 POUNDS A MONTH. PLUS HE HAS A WIFE AND KIDS. WHEN HE GOT UPSET AND SAID HE MIGHT AS WELL JUST GIVE UP AND TOP HIMSELF, THE C S A SAID THEN WE HAVE TO TELL THE POLICE FOR YOUR SAFE.... what about his daugthers well bing ?(mind)_ SO Sameone please,please,please help my son.
  • Looking for guidance or support about seeing your children after separation? Find details for local meetings in February here: http://www.fnf.org.uk/help-and-support-2/local-branch-meetings

    Families Need Fathers (FNF) is a registered UK charity, founded in 1974. It provides information and support to parents, including unmarried parents, of either sex.
    fnf.org.ukFamilies Need Fathers (FNF) is a registered UK charity, founded in 1974. It provides information and support to parents, including unmarried parents, of either sex.

    2015-02-02T15:14:40+0000
  • Without the help from fnf I really don't know where we would be today myself grandma and my son. I obtained a wealth of information which helped beyond my expectations where after a gruelling 12 months attending court we successfully gained custody of my now 5 year old granddaughter. Thank you thank you families need fathers :)
  • Our January newsletter is now online, including updated guidance on McKenzie Friends that can also be very useful for litigants-in-person: http://goo.gl/3ubyN0

    Families Need Fathers (FNF) is a registered UK charity, founded in 1974. It provides information and support to parents, including unmarried parents, of either sex.
    fnf.org.ukFamilies Need Fathers (FNF) is a registered UK charity, founded in 1974. It provides information and support to parents, including unmarried parents, of either sex.

    2015-01-30T14:17:05+0000
  • How are children's 'wishes and feelings' obtained in family law cases? An independent social worker explains the process: http://www.familylawweek.co.uk/site.aspx?i=ed137159

    Paul Bishop, an independent social worker and formerly a Children’s Guardian, draws on 20 years’ experience of interviewing children involved in family proceedings.
    familylawweek.co.ukPaul Bishop, an independent social worker and formerly a Children’s Guardian, draws on 20 years’ experience of interviewing children involved in family proceedings.

    2015-01-29T11:40:49+0000

FNF_Media RT @dad_info: Some wonderful comments from @bryony_gordon in todays @Telegraph regarding Shared Parental Leave & 'hands-on dads' http://t.…
FNF_Media RT @fest4westham: "When I'm older, I want to be like you dad" 6yr old's priceless words during school run. #fatherhood #DadAndSon @FNF_Medi
FNF_Media @ullainoxford No problem, happy to!
FNF_Media RT @atkinsondavid: And catch my @TelegraphMen story from Xmas week via RT from @FNF_Media: http://t.co/vtzpTliSec > Share your view
FNF_Media Government plans for court ordered DNA testing are a positive move - FNF comment: http://t.co/v6cgPpv2XH
FNF_Media Our January newsletter is now online! http://t.co/emnodMG1xn
FNF_Media RT @kerrykeane101: @FNF_Media please sign and retweet to Save Liverpool Children's Centres http://t.co/TkNYRFlsjK
FNF_Media Can you help with a survey on attitudes to prenatal genetic testing? More details here: http://t.co/QKbLaThoTw
FNF_Media Need guidance or support about seeing your children after separation? Find details for our February meetings here: http://t.co/iJ1dLi317x
FNF_Media Need guidance or support about seeing your children after separation? Find details for our January meetings here: http://t.co/iJ1dLi317x
FNF_Media RT @DJMarjoribanks: @FNF_Media Pls RT: @Relate_charity seeking separated parents for survey to inform service, WIN an iPad Air 2! https://t…
FNF_Media What to do if you are having trouble seeing your children: http://t.co/hGqHdIe8Fa @thedivorcemag
FNF_Media RT @Brynley_H: Been there with this & failed dismally, as my family can testify. Sound advice for parents from @FNF_Media could help http:/…
FNF_Media RT @drsue2014: 2014 reflections: delighted to talk about research @FNF_Media Newcastle branch meeting - so warm and welcoming
FNF_Media RT @ullainoxford: @FNF_Media Pls RT? Oxford Uni seeking fathers to share past experiences of disabled/chronically ill child with flu http:/…
FNF_Media RT @TCMFamilyLaw: New Case Law: Successful appeal against order for no contact. https://t.co/t7PiFLUd4Q - please share - #familylaw
FNF_Media Interesting article in the Telegraph today about parental alienation: http://t.co/57EUlA5pi9
FNF_Media RT @SarahHelplines: Good to meet @questgaycath @mindcharity and @fnf_media to talk the Helplines Standard today - great discussion re: conf…
FNF_Media @kathringerling @DrPDickinson Absolutely, parents should always put the children's interest first and work together whenever possible.
FNF_Media Finding handovers for contact difficult? These tips can help to make the process a little easier: http://t.co/gtS7sJdItt

FNF HSSF Kite Mark Award

Families Need Fathers has been awarded the Help and Support for Separated Families Kite Mark which is a new UK government accreditation scheme for organisations offering help to separated families.

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Upcoming Events

2/03/2015 Mon: London Central Solicitor Clinic
2/03/2015 Mon: Manchester Meeting
2/03/2015 Mon: Edinburgh Meeting
2/03/2015 Mon: Oxford Meeting (check day with branch)
2/03/2015 Mon: London Central Meeting
2/03/2015 Mon: Reading Meeting
3/03/2015 Tue: Newcastle Meeting
3/03/2015 Tue: Leeds Central Meeting
3/03/2015 Tue: Bristol Meeting
3/03/2015 Tue: Northampton Meeting
3/03/2015 Tue: London North West (Harrow) Meeting
4/03/2015 Wed: London West Meeting & Solicitor Clinic